herbals licorice

RECND338

Licorice

Scientific:Glycyrrhiza glabra
Other:Licorice

Indications

Endocrine
• stress
• adrenal fatigue
• adreno-corticoid insufficiency
• Addison's disease
pancreatitis

Gastrointestinal
• inflammation of GI tract
- esophagitis
- gastroesophageal reflux disorder (GERD)
- gastritis
- laryngitis
- gastric ulcers
- apthous ulcers

Immune
• viruses
- herpes simplex virus (HSV)
- shingles
- influenza
- human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)
- severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)
- hepatitis (HAV, HBV, HCV)
- Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) - mononucleosis
• cancer
• leishmaniasis

Cardiovascular
• hypotension

Reproduction
polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) - in combo with chinese peony
• infertility
hirsutism
• menopausal hot flashes

Other
eczema
acne rosacea

Actions

• adrenal tonic
antiviral
antiulcerogenic
expectorant
demulcent
antitussive
antiinflammatory
hepatoprotective
• hypertensive
• phytoestrogen

Constituents

• triterpene glycoside (glycyrrhizinic acid, glycyrrhetinic acid)
• flavenoids
• isoflavonoids
• polysaccharides

Posology

• Tincture (1:5 in 40% EtOH): 1-3 ml tid
• Decoction (dried powdered root): 0.5-1 tsp tid

Safety

• Long-term use: large amounts should not be taken for longer than 6-8 weeks.

• Pseudohyperaldosteronism - chronic use may cause symptoms of hyperaldosteronism including: hypertension, hypokalemia, weak muscles, dizziness, edema.

• Blood pressure - should be used with caution in patients with hypertension.

Pregnancy & lactation: should be used with caution.

Note: Deglycerized licorice (DGL) does not cause affect cortisol and therefore does not cause pseudohyperaldosteronism. It can not be used to tonify the adrenals but still has benefit for GERD, ulcers and gastritis.

Interactions

Contra-indicated with the following medication that also cause hypokalemia:
• loop diuretics
• thiazide diuretics
• cardiac glycosides
• antiarrhythmic drugs

Caution in patients taking:
• stimulating laxatives (anthraquinones)
• corticosteroids
• MOA-inhibitors

References

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Barnes J, Anderson LA, Phillipson JD. Herbal Medicines, 3rd ed. London: Pharmaceutical Press, 2007.

Bone K. Principles and Practice of Phytotherapy. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone, 2000.

Bone K. A Clinical Guide to Blending Liquid Herbs: Herbal Formulations for the Individual Patient. St Louis, MO: Churchill Livingstone, 2003.

Brinker F. The Toxicology of Botanical Medicines, 3rd ed. Sandy, Oregon: Eclectic Medical Publications, 2000.

Felter HW, Lloyd JU. King's American Dispensatory. 1898. http://www.ibiblio.org/herbmed/eclectic/kings/main.html. Accessed: August 19, 2006.

Hoffman D. Medical Herbalism. Rochester, Vermont: Healing Arts Press, 2003.

Weiss RF. Herbal Medicine. Beaconsfield, England: Beaconsfield Publishers Ltd, 1988.

Williamson EM, ed. Major Herbs of Ayurveda. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone, 2002

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