herbals korean-ginseng

RECND339

Korean Ginseng

Scientific:Panax ginseng
Other:Asian Ginseng

Indications

Highly regarded herb in Asian medicine. Tonifies qi and nourishes yang. More stimulating and warming than Panax quinquefolius. One of the most stimulating adaptogens.

Endocrine
• stress
• adrenal fatigue
chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS)
diabetes mellitus type 2
• hypoglycemia
hypothyroidism
pancreatitis
fibromyalgia

Reproduction
• sexual dysfunction
- erectile dysfunction (ED)
- infertility

Nervous
• poor cognition
- memory
- attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, ADD)
• mood disturbances
- depression
- anxiety
• neurodegenerative disorders
- dementia
- Parkinson's disease
- Alzheimer's disease
• drug withdrawal
- smoking cessation
- alcohol abuse

Immune
• chemotherapy and radiation side-effects
- fatigue
- immunosuppresion (leukopenia, neutropenia)
allergies

Note: Research suggest that it can significantly increase survival rates in cancer patients.

Gastrointestinal
• tonifies spleen & stomach in TCM to improve
- dyspepsia
- bloating
- diarrhea
- gastric ulcers
pancreatitis
halitosis

Cardiovascular
Raynaud's
• intermittent claudication
• arrhythmia
angina pectoris
hyperlipidemia

Actions

adaptogen
immunomodulator
• tonic
stimulant
sedative
male tonic
• sexual tonic
anticancer
nootropic
• cardiotonic
cardioprotective
hepatoprotective
antiarrhythmic
hypoglycemic
antihyperlipidemic
antiulcerogenic
antiinflammatory
• antiaging

Constituents

• Terpenoids
• Steroidal glycosides (ginsenosides)

Posology

• Tincture (1:5 in 60% EtOH): 1-2 ml tid
• Decoction (dried powdered root): 0.5-1 tsp tid

Safety

Contraindications: Acute infection.

Side effects: Increased blood pressure.

Caution: Use with anticoagulants (e.g. coumadin); may potentiate effects. Hypertensive patients; monitor BP.

Pregnancy and lactation: Korean ginseng deemed safe.

Interactions

• High doses: may cause aggitation, insomnia, diarrhea, skin lesions
• Cardiac glycosides - potential for interaction
• Anticoagulants (e.g. coumadin) - known to interaction
• MAO inhibitors - suspected to interact
• Stimulants - may potentiate them
• Drug metabolism - known to inhibit specific P450 (CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP1B1)
• Oral hypoglycemics - may potentiate them because ginseng decrease blood sugar

References

"Show references"

"Hide references"

Barnes J, Anderson LA, Phillipson JD. Herbal Medicines, 3rd ed. London: Pharmaceutical Press, 2007.

Bone K. Principles and Practice of Phytotherapy. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone, 2000.

Bone K. A Clinical Guide to Blending Liquid Herbs: Herbal Formulations for the Individual Patient. St Louis, MO: Churchill Livingstone, 2003.

Brinker F. The Toxicology of Botanical Medicines, 3rd ed. Sandy, Oregon: Eclectic Medical Publications, 2000.

Felter HW, Lloyd JU. King's American Dispensatory. 1898. http://www.ibiblio.org/herbmed/eclectic/kings/main.html. Accessed: August 19, 2006.

Hoffman D. Medical Herbalism. Rochester, Vermont: Healing Arts Press, 2003.

Weiss RF. Herbal Medicine. Beaconsfield, England: Beaconsfield Publishers Ltd, 1988.

Williamson EM, ed. Major Herbs of Ayurveda. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone, 2002

Disclaimer: This content is subject to change. The information is intended to inform and educate; it does not replace the medical evaluation, advice, diagnosis or treatment by a healthcare professional. www.healthydigestionclinic.com © 2015 NDAssist Inc. and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.