products aor rhodiola-rosea-with-ginseng

Rhodiola Rosea with Ginseng

By : AOR - Advanced Orthomolecular Research

Indications

• Physical or psychological stress
• Immune function

Ingredients

Supplement Facts
Serving Size: 1 Capsule

Amount PerServing
Rhodiola rosea (min. 3% rosavin, 1% salidroside) …..… 100 mg
Panax ginseng (30:1 extract) …..… 100 mg

Non-medicinal ingredients: Capsule: hypromellose.

AOR Guarantees: that no ingredients not listed on the label have been added to the product. Contains no wheat, gluten, corn, nuts, dairy, soy, eggs, fish, shellfish or any animal byproduct.

Source: Natural botanical root extracts

Description

Actions:
• Enables the body to make the best use of its energy
• Enhances physical and mental performance
• Supports a healthy immune system
• Helps prevent burnout

Background Information
Panax ginseng's Roots
Panax ginseng is the Asian variety of ginseng, also known as red, Korean or Chinese ginseng. It has slightly different medicinal properties than other types of ginseng. The root looks like a human body with arms and legs. The main active constituents extracted from the root are the ginsenosides, of which more than 40 types have been identified. The ginsenosides have been noted to have beneficial health effects for just about every aspect of health. Although it is primarily recognized as a restorative' or an adaptogen, in Traditional Chinese Medicine Panax ginseng has been used effectively for thousands of years for a variety of ailments, more than what it is currently being studied for in Western medicine, which ranges from mood/stress/well-being to various aspects of cardiovascular health to cancer prevention to physical and mental performance, and more. The most recent interest is in its immune-modulating properties. Recently, Korean ginseng has been a best-seller for flu prevention, and there is currently a clinical trial underway to verify whether it is actually does so.
Rhodiola's Roots

Rhodiola is authentic Russian Rhodiola rosea, an herb with a long history of use as an adaptogen and sexual tonic in the traditional medicine of Iceland, Norway, the Carpathian Mountains of the Ukraine, and above all in Siberia, for adaptation to the rigors of life on the tundras of North-central Asia. Dioscorides, the father of medical botany, provides the earliest documented medicinal use of this botanical in De Materia Medica, a phytomedicinal text which formed the basis of Western pharmaceutical and herbal writing for the next 1500 years. In more recenttimes, Rhodiola preparations have been listed in the national pharmacopoeias of France, Sweden, Denmark, and the former USSR, as an adaptogen and brain tonic.
In the nations of the former Soviet Union, Rhodiola is traditionally prepared in the form of a tincture called nastojka
, decocted from fresh Rhodiola roots by soaking the roots in 40% alcohol for one week. Rigorous testing of Rhodiola's adaptogenic properties began in the former Soviet Union in the mid-60s, and has continued to this day. Four decades of animal studies and controlled clinical trials in humans clearly demonstrate that Rhodiola extract is a true adaptogenic botanical.
Adaptogens Help Us Adapt As classic adaptogens, Rhodiola rosea and Panax ginseng extracts both steel the organism against the eventuality of stressors, and prevent an overshoot into burnout when those stressors are endured. This can be seen in the simultaneous bolstering of the baseline levels of adaptive neurotransmitters and hormones that are typically increased in response to adaptation to the rigors of endurance training and in the prevention of overactivation of those same pathways when the organism is in a stressful environment.
Research
Cardiovascular Adaptation When lab animals are subjected to extreme cold or to massive doses of the stress hormone adrenaline, the regular, controlled beating of their hearts is disrupted and the oxygen supply is temporarily cut off. But Rhodiola supplements prevent arrhythmia, reduce the damage to the muscle cells of the heart, and balance the overflow of stress neurotransmitters normally associated with these stressors.
As another example of the adaptive, balancing effect of Rhodiola, its key component salidroside has been found to prevent excessive blood sugar levels after an injection of adrenaline (which normally causes the body to pump out more glucose) and to prevent blood sugar levels from falling too low after an injection of insulin.

Panax ginseng has also been studied extensively for blood sugar control, but a recent meta-analysis found that the results on this topic have been inconsistent, possibly due to varying ginsenoside content of the different extracts used. However, a recent 12-week study on menopausal women showed significant reductions in the thickness of the carotid artery wall, in LDL and in Total Cholesterol, as well as in a menopausal symptoms rating scale with 3g of Panax ginseng per day.
Physical Performance and COPD Clinical trials have observed the effects of both Rhodiola rosea and Panax ginseng intake on physical performance in healthy adults, and Panax ginseng is even known to be a safe supplement to improve the physical capacity of those suffering from COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). Both herbs can increase time to exhaustion and improve breathing parameters. Athletes have been known to consume Panax ginseng before an event. Interestingly, one Rhodiola study showed that physical performance parameters did not improve more over 28 days of supplementation than they already had after just 2 days!
Cognition In another study, a Rhodiola rosea extract along with a combination of vitamins and minerals was given to 120 adults with physical and cognitive deficiencies in a 12 week drug monitoring study. There was a significant improvement in these deficiencies, with observed improvements in symptoms such as exhaustion, decreased motivation, daytime sleepiness, sleep disturbances, concentration deficiencies, forgetfulness, susceptibility to stress and irritability. This is likely due to Rhodiola's ability to influence the levels of several neurotransmitters in the brain. In rats, Rhodiola Rosea has been found to benefit learning and memory, as well as responses to stress.
Panax ginseng has been reported to promote a sense of calmness during mental stress and improve working memory and cognitive endurance during mentally demanding tasks. One study showed improved calmness and better mental math skills with 400mg over just 8 days. It has also been studied in small subject groups as a potential support for those with Alzheimer's, although larger studies are needed.
How Do They Work? Animal studies have given us some clues to the neurochemical basis of these effects: Rhodiola has well-documented effects on the metabolism of a variety of neurotransmitters. For instance, Rhodiola enhances the transport of the serotonin precursors tryptophan and 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) across the blood-brain barrier, and decreases the action of the serotonin-degrading catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) enzyme. It also boosts brain levels of dopamine, acetylcholine, and norepinephrine, all of which are key neurotransmitters targeted by major classes of antidepressant drugs. Rhodiola also appears to influence the synthesis, levels, and/or activity of endorphins and enkephalins, since blocking the receptors for some of these feel-good
peptides negates some of Rhodiola's effects.
On the other hand, the mechanisms of action of Panax ginseng on the stress response are not yet well understood. However, they are thought to affect any combination of the hypothalamic –pituitary-adrenal axis (the hormonal stress axis), neurotransmitter signaling or the cardiovascular system (for example, improved nitric oxide production).
It is often difficult to pin down exactly how adaptogens work, possibly because the stress response is a combination of so many different body processes including physical, emotional and mental. However, we do know that they work, giving our bodies the extra boost they need to keep going.

Market Trends
Rhodiola and ginseng are among the most effective adaptogenic substances on the market. Some of the other common adaptogenic supplements available are maca, schisandra and ashwaganda.

AOR Advantage
AOR's Rhodiola Rosea with Ginseng provides a concentrated form of both pure Rhodiola and ginseng root extract in an effective dosage. The efficacy of both substances is backed by longstanding scientific research.

Quantity

60 Vegi-Caps

Dose

Take 1 capsule twice daily, or as directed by a qualified health care practitioner.

Potential side effects/Safety

Cautions: For occasional use only, unless directed by a health care provider. Consult a health care practitioner prior to use if you have diabetes or are taking antidepressant medications, blood thinners or digoxin.

Pregnancy/Nursing: Consult a health care practitioner prior to use

References

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Brekhman II, Dardymov IV. New substances of plant origin, which increase nonspecific resistance. Ann Rev Pharm.1969; 9: 419-30.

De Bock K, Eijnde BO, Ramaekers M and Hespel P. Acute rhodiola rosea intake can improve endurance exercise performance. International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism. 2004;14:298-307.

Fintelmann V, Gruenwald J. Efficacy and tolerability of a rhodiola rosea extract in adults with physical and cognitive deficiencies. Advances in Therapy 2007;24(4):929-939

Gross D, Shenkman Z, Bleiberg B et al. (2002). Ginseng improves pulmonary functions and exercise capacity in patients with COPD. Monaldi Arch Chest Dis. 57(5-6):242-6

Ha KC, Kim MG, Oh MR, Choi EK, Back HI, Kim SY, Park EO, Kwon DY, Yang HJ, Kim MJ, Kang HJ, Lee JH, Choi KM, Chae SW, Lee CS. A placebo-controlled trial of Korean red ginseng extract for preventing influenza-like illness in healthy adults. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2012 Feb 8;12:10.

Jung HL, Kwak HE, Kim SS, et al. (2011). Effects of Panax ginseng supplementation on muscle damage and inflammation after uphill treadmill running in humans. Am J Chin Med. 39(3):441-50.

Kelly GS. Rhodiola Rosea: A possible plant adaptogen. Altern Med Rev 2001;6(3):293-302.

Kim HG, Yoo SR, Park HJ, et al. (2011).Antioxidant effects of Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer in healthy subjects: A randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Food Chem Toxicol. 49(9):2229-35.

Kim SH, Park KS, Chang MJ & Sung JH (2005). Effects of Panax ginseng extract on exercise-induced oxidative stress. J Sports med Phys Fitness. 45(2): 178-82.

Ma SW, Benzie IF, Chu TT, et al. (2008). Effect of Panax ginseng supplementation on biomarkers of glucose tolerance, antioxidant status and oxidative stress in type 2 diabetic subjects: results of a placebo-controlled human intervention trial. Diabetes Obes Metab. 10(11):1125-7.

Maslova LV, Kondrat'ev BIu, Maslov LN, Lishmanov IuB. The cardioprotective and antiadrenergic activity of an extract of Rhodiola rosea in stress. Eksp Klin Farmakol 1994 Nov-Dec; 57(6): 61-3.

Reay JL, Kennedy DO, & Scholey AB (2005). Single doses of Panax ginseng (G115) reduce blood glucose levels and improve cognitive performance during sustained mental activity. Journal of Psychopharmacology: 19(4):357-65

Vuksan V, Sung MK, Sievenpiper JL, et al. (2008). Korean red ginseng (Panax ginseng) improves glucose and insulin regulation in well-controlled, type 2 diabetes: results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of efficacy and safety. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 18(1):46-56.

Yao-Zu Xiang, Hong-Cai Shang, Xiu-Mei Gao and Bo-Li Zhang. A Comparison of the Ancient Use of Ginseng in Traditional Chinese Medicine with Modern Pharmacological Experiments and Clinical Trials. Phytotherapy Research, 22, 851–858 (2008).

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